Popular Search

Microsoft would be done to combat Google Chrome the operating system?

| , , , , | 2 comments »

Bookmark and Share


Google Chrome the operating system and has taken the media in the world by storm. Everyone thinks that groups want to limit Microsoft with this operating system. Bill Gates the richest man on earth, thanks to the success of the Windows operating system. This is the core business for his company, and they do not want to see it get destroyed. So far, perhaps the main focus of Microsoft's decision-makers to combat groups in this area.


Of course, posing a challenge and Windows is not so easy. Enthusiastic crowds of Apple's operating system believe that Apple is much better than Windows. However, most people do not think so. Then, we must think in Linux, which is a free operating system. What could be better than free? Not only that, the fans feel that Linux is a stronger and more secure than Windows. However, the reality is that the operating system on the market, the position for Linux and Windows is just like AMD against Intel in the market. However, I think that Microsoft decision-makers would take it seriously because the groups already on the Internet, Google has emerged as the leading search engine thanks to the wonderful.

Also, AdSense is more popular than their counterparts from Microsoft and Yahoo. I also like Blogspot blogger or more of the Yahoo 360 or Windows Live Spaces when it comes to blogging. In the last one decade, we have noticed that Google has come up with some successful products. I think Gmil. Internet users and used to use Yahoo Mail and Hotmail At that time, most users a lot of inconvenience with 4 MB or 6 MB to store e-mail. Gmail revolutionized the concept of Gmail by offering gigabytes of storage. Yahoo and Hotmail and received, but by that time, Gmail has become very popular.

Now, Gmail is in third place behind Yahoo Mail and Hotmail when it comes to web based email services, but the important thing is that the groups managed to get some decent amount of market share and this is impressive for a newcomer. You have to understand one thing about the e-mail messages. I opened the box, Yahoo Mail in 2001, and I still use it because dealing with people and I know that the mailbox. It is like the book title. When it came Gmail], and I opened an account but I did not stop using e-mail Yahoo. However, it can not happen the same thing about the operating system. Now, I use widows. If you want to make a transition to the operating system, Google Chrome, then lost hardly anything. This is Microsoft Ting officials will have to remember.

I think that Microsoft should adopt strategies is two fold. Of course, they have to improve and Windows on a regular basis, which was always done. On the other hand, we must challenge Chrome the operating system in its territory. You know that Chrome the operating system will be mainly on the concept of cloud computing, and will run this operating system in your browser. Microsoft should be something like this and the challenge groups.

Sphere: Related Content

Panasonic Toughbook CF - F8: 14.1-inch Laptop Business

| , , | 0 comments »

Bookmark and Share

Panasonic has come up with computers and rugged notebook business. Panasonic Toughbook laptop F8 - Coalition forces target businessmen who wish to get a laptop computer that, when you are away. And 3.7-pound weight increased credibility with a laptop computer and rugged work. Here the features of the laptop:


The processor and RAM, and display graphics
Panasonic Toughbook F8 - Cystic fibrosis is powered by Intel Core 2 Duo processor P9300, which is pretty much fast. It also provides 3GB of memory that have succeeded in running 32-bit version of Windows Vista Business operating system. The only problem here is that it does not contain any dedicated graphics processing unit (GPU), and thus depriving you quality graphics performance.

The laptop comes with 14.1-inch display before in 1280 - - 800 pixel resolution, an improvement of 1024 by 768 pixel resolution as with previous models by the mobile device.

Presidents of the Council and the touchpad
The keyboard provides a laptop spacious, but the circular touchpad is not large enough for comfortable navigation. However, the two mouse buttons implemented satisfactorily.

External Communications and slots
Panasonic Toughbook CF - F8 business laptop supports Bluetooth, and Gobi. In addition, the laptop and some foreign, including the nozzles, it is useful to the reader PC card, flash SDHC card reader and three ports 2.0 ports, plus VGA, Ethernet and modem jacks. The only problem is that the distance between the ports of ... Very small, and becomes a large problem while using flash memory. In addition, the laptop does not come with built-in video camera.

Software
Laptop also comes pre-loaded with some excellent software. You can keep a backup of your data through the [Roxio Creator LJB, while using [Roxio BackOnTrack you can create the disk. You can save battery power by using energy Panasonic plan to extend assistance in the Control Panel.

Pricing
Price seems to be the negative side of the coalition forces Panasonic Toughbook F8 - laptop also is the parameter with the $ 2499. Therefore, you can see only a small number of businessmen, who are looking for a rugged laptop and when they are on the go, and would like to go for this device, because the price attached to the laptop is far from being able to get a laptop user of the year.

Sphere: Related Content

Google Chrome Operating System: Microsoft can give a tough challenge?

| , , , | 0 comments »

Bookmark and Share

Google News to highlight the operating system alone, Chrome the operating system, and create a big wave in all parts of the world evolving. On July 7, 2009, Google announced it is going to release Chrom operating system, and a web-based operating system. Immediately after the news, the stock market reacted positively fire stocks stocks Groups of $ 401.77 while Microsoft fell 1.9% to $ 22.10.



Google Chrome will initially run the operating system on netbooks at low prices. The netbooks will be equipped with Chrome the operating system to be released in mid-2010. So, what are the main advantages of the operating system Chrome?

* First: Most importantly, it will be free. Currently, Microsoft charges $ 25 to use the Windows XP laptop too and $ 45 for Windows 7. Even if it reduces prices, and Chrom netbooks will run the operating system is cheaper.

* When Windows has been developed, there were not online. Now, the Internet is everywhere. The new operating system, Google Chrome will be on the Internet programs that will run on your browser. This means, does not require installation. In Google the words "speed, simplicity and security are the key aspects of the operating system Google Chrome." For this reason, netbooks are the first target of the operating system Google Chrome because it does not come with a high configuration. All you have to do is to stay connected to the Internet all the time.

* Operating system for users of Google Chrome will be able to do everything, including reading emails, writing documents, playing in all other things they are doing on their computers. New Google Chrome will run the operating system through the Internet browser.

* Chrome will run the operating system on both x86 chips and Armenia.


Now, the question is millions of dollars, would this give Chrome the operating system of any major advantage over the operating system and Windows? The answer is, a resounding "no" at this moment. At the outset, on the basis of Ubuntu Linux netbooks did not become popular. People prefer Windows. Moreover, until now, all key applications and Microsoft and Windows in keeping the mind, and not any other browser. The new web-based applications are required to be developed. These are some of the major challenges that will have groups to overcome if it really wants to compete with Microsoft.


On the front presonal, I live in Bangladesh, and the poor Third World countries, where it is not possible for people to pay a large sum of money to buy original software. If the operating system, Google Chrome truly delivers as it promises, then he would be snoring is great for users like myself.

Sphere: Related Content

Lenovo IdeaPad S10 - 2 and comes with a longer battery life

| , , , , , | 0 comments »

Bookmark and Share

Lenovo S10 IdeaPad been reviewed with some enhanced features. The new version of the Lenovo IdeaPad S10 provides you with a larger keyboard and touch. It provides about 6 hours up to 6 - cell battery. However, it should be that the battery life has been extended, due to the 6 - cell battery. Another problem with this laptop is specially designed exterior color of the ash, which does not seem very attractive. In addition, the interior design is not very attractive too.


In general, when it comes to design, the Lenovo IdeaPad S10 - 2 is not a winner. However, you should look at other features of the laptop side by side with a price tag of $ 399. Despite the fashion fanatic users may not go for this laptop, other users can find them pretty much comparable features and attractive prices. Laptops may face stiff competition from some of the Toshiba NB205 Asus electrical and electronic equipment and computers 1005HA which also provides almost similar kind of features, located in the same price range.

Sphere: Related Content

Bing is to allow users to get updates on Twitter

| , , | 0 comments »

Bookmark and Share


Twitter is already a very big name in the Internet and it attracted nearly 20 million users who blame the Journal. Some people think that it can be a very large player in the Internet industry within a very short period of time because it has seen very impressive growth in a very short time. One of the attractive ideas of Twitter is that it is updated all the time and in every second. As a result, you could be updated with news and stories that you want to know. Microsoft's new search engine Bing some accounts now indexing Twitter.

Of course, the main problem is that this will not satisfy most users for those who are a fan of Twitter like to see that they can look for updates for all accounts, not just for some users. In any case, Ping has scored a point against Google in this regard and I think that Google is going to reply soon.

Sphere: Related Content

Nokia 5800 Navigation edition comes to lead the way

| , , , , , | 0 comments »

Bookmark and Share

Today Nokia unveiled the Nokia 5800 Navigation Edition - a full GPS-centric variant of the Nokia 5800 XpresMusic. Using the momentum gained by the original XpressMusic handset, the new gadget matches the functionality of its predecessor almost perfectly. The main differences are the added lifetime Drive and Walk navigation license and the cool looking stand and car charger that allow you to easily use the phone as an in-car SatNav unit.

There's only one other difference compared to the original model according to the data sheet of the Nokia 5800 Navigation Edition. It will be available in Chrome and Black color combo rather than any of the two-colored versions of the Nokia 5800 XpressMusic.

Nokia 5800 Navigation Edition will come in three different flavors, each packing quad-band GSM connectivity. Two of them will also pack WLAN and dual-band 3G with HSDPA, while the third one (we are guessing it will be available in either China or some emerging markets) will lack both connectivity options.

Nokia 5800 Navigation edition Nokia 5800 Navigation edition Nokia 5800 Navigation edition Nokia 5800 Navigation edition Nokia 5800 Navigation edition Nokia 5800 Navigation edition Nokia 5800 Navigation edition
Nokia 5800 Navigation edition

Unfortunately, judging by the promo video published, the Nokia 5800 Navigation Edition's 3.2" screen seems to be as poor under direct sunlight as the one of the first S60 5th edition handset. Considering that the handset is meant to sit on your dashboard, frequently exposed to sunlight, this flaw might make it somewhat less than a perfect travel companion.

But never mind our concerns, here goes the video in question for you to check out. It introduces the keys features of the Nokia 5800 Navigation edition and demonstrates the last version of Ovi Maps GPS navigation software that comes preinstalled.

Nokia 5800 Navigation Edition will start shipping before the end of the current quarter for an estimated 285 euro before taxes or subsidies.

Sphere: Related Content

IPhone 3Gs play 1080p video, and enjoy the sound of jaws dropping

| , , , | 0 comments »

Bookmark and Share

IPhone makes it difficult to really do not like it - it seems the latest generation of iPhone - and the rapid 3Gs can play 1080p video. Yes, 1080p. Programs are not quite ready yet, but the devices. So, we're just a software update away from having 3Gs become one of the most portable drives are very popular high-definition video?

Engadget men spent time playing with the 3Gs after reading the Chinese participation in a forum that the phone frequently asked 1080p video up to 30Mbps bit rate. Had achieved success as different - 10Mbps 1080p video played back fine, but 20Mbps 720p was stumbling, and audio decoder is not free of impurities after as well. [HD] driver is not officially supported until the bugs are to be expected, and the important thing here is that the device is able to read high-definition.

A little Googling suppressed our main concern - 3Gs iPhone will be able to output decoded video after that? There is an element composite cables for iPhone but there is still no HDMI cables. However, the answer to what seems to be positive - video and component cables are capable of dealing with up to 1080i/60Hz video.

Well, the quality of some will be lost during the gradual conversion of the overlapping, but limited to, 1080i seems to be a completely different nature - one of law. Transmitted over the video while HDMI can be DRM protected, can not be analog video, making it easy to copy and deny the usefulness of all those schemes to protect content.

Still, 1080i offers great quality of 1080i and 720p content is much more common than 1080p so more than once so it's not a problem. Of course, is not certain until the official, but it seems that iPhone 3Gs just might be able to output high definition video. And most (if not all) LCD TVs and component inputs so keep your fingers crossed.

Sphere: Related Content

Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH1

| , , , , | 0 comments »

Bookmark and Share



Review based on a production Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH1 with firmware v1.1

When Panasonic announced the DMC-G1 in September 2008, the industry saw its first real innovation for a long time: an electronic viewfinder interchangeable lens camera with a large (Four Thirds size) imaging sensor. Panasonic had managed to overcome a whole list of technical hurdles to produce the camera and the G1 featured an electronic viewfinder that got pretty close to a good mirror and prism, plus a contrast-detect autofocus that in terms of speed and accuracy could rival 'traditional' phase-detect systems of DSLRs.

However, the G1 was lacking one feature that had been a standard on digital compact cameras for a long time and had just found its way onto digital SLRs as well: video recording. There are no obvious technical barriers to the implementation of a video feature on mirrorless cameras such as the G1 (in fact it should be much easier than on a DSLR) and therefore it did not come as a big surprise to anyone when, only a few months after the G1 launch, in March 2009 Panasonic rectified this 'issue' with the announcement of the DMC GH1. The new model is, despite a new sensor design, essentially a G1 with an added movie mode.

However, the GH1's HD movie mode is more than just another add-on feature. In combination with the newly developed 14-140mm F4.0-5.8 kit lens that has, in terms of aperture control and focusing, been optimized for shooting video, it transforms the GH1 into a true stills/video hybrid that can record HD video while at the same time producing high quality stills images. And whilst doing all that it is still in line with Panasonic's original reasons for introducing the Micro Four Thirds system; to produce smaller cameras that act more like compact DSCs whilst offering the quality and versatility of a DSLR.

It all looks great on paper but can the GH1 keep up in real life with the marketing promises? Read our review to find out.

Please note that because of the operational similarities between the Panasonic DMC-GH1 and G1 a proportion of text and images in this review has been taken over directly from the Panasonic DMC-G1 review.

Compared to G1 - key differences

The list of new features on the GH1 compared to the G1 is not very long. Despite its new sensor design the GH1 is essentially a G1 with an added HD video mode. However, this arguably most important new feature is likely to make the camera appeal to a much larger group of potential buyers. The following list and table give you an overview of all differences between the two models.

  • HD video mode with stereo sound recording
  • New sensor which provides four different aspect ratios with the same angle of view
  • New 14-140mm F4.0-5.8 stabilized kit lens with a design that has been optimized for shooting movies
  • Face recognition

Panasonic GH1 vs. G1 feature and specification differences

Canon EOS 40D
Panasonic DMC GH1
Canon EOS 40D
Panasonic DMC G1
Sensor • 4/3 type MOS ('Live MOS sensor')
• 14.0 million total pixels
• 12.1 million effective pixels
• RGB (Primary) color filter array
• 4/3 type MOS ('Live MOS sensor')
• 13.06 million total pixels
• 12.11 million effective pixels
• RGB (Primary) color filter array
Image sizes • 4000 x 3000 (4:3)
• 2816 x 2112 (4:3)
• 2048 x 1536 (4:3)
• 4128 x 2752 (3:2)
• 2928 x 1952 (3:2)
• 2064 x 1376 (3:2)
• 4352 x 2448 (16:9)
• 3072 x 1728 (16:9)
• 1920 x 1080 (16:9)
• 2992 x 2992 (1:1)
• 2112 x 2112 (1:1)
• 1504 x 1504 (1:1)
• 4000 x 3000 (4:3)
• 2816 x 2112 (4:3)
• 2048 x 1536 (4:3)
• 4000 x 2672 (3:2)
• 2816 x 1880 (3:2)
• 2048 x 1360 (3:2)
• 4000 x 2248 (16:9)
• 2816 x 1584 (16:9)
• 1920 x 1080 (16:9)
Aspect ratio • 4:3
• 3:2
• 16:9
• 1:1
4:3
3:2
16:9
Video mode

• AVCHD :
1920 x 1080
1280 x 720

• Motion JPEG:
1280 x 720, 30fps
848 x 480, 30fps
640 x 480, 30fps
320 x 240, 30fps

No video capability
Metering modes • Intelligent Multiple
• Center-Weighted
• Spot
• Multiple-Weighted
• Center-Weighted
• Spot
AE Bracketing • 3,5,7 frames
• 1/3 or 2/3 , +/-2.0 EV steps*
• 3 frames
• 1/3 to 2.0 EV steps
Connectors

• USB 2.0 (Hi-Speed)
• Video output (PAL/ NTSC)
• HDMI Type C
• external microphone
• Wired remote control DMW-RSL1 (optional)

• USB 2.0 (High Speed)
• Video output (PAL / NTSC)
• HDMI

• Wired remote control DMW-RSL1 (optional)
Dimensions 124 mm x 90mm x 45 mm 124 mm x 84 mm x 45 mm
Weight (body only) Approx. 385g / 13.58 oz Approx. 380 g / 13.40 oz

Micro Four Thirds

The GH1 is, like the G1 and the recently announced Olympus E-P1, a Micro Four Thirds camera. Olympus and Panasonic announced the new, mirrorless format / lens mount based on (and compatible with) Four Thirds in August 2008. The Micro Four Thirds system uses the same sensor size (18 x 13.5 mm) but allows slimmer cameras by removing the mirror box and optical viewfinder. The new format has three key technical differences: (1) roughly half the flange back distance (distance from mount to the sensor), (2) a smaller diameter lens mount (6 mm smaller) and (3) two additional contact points for lens-to-body communication (now 11 points). Removing the mirror mechanism allows this shorter flange back distance, meaning lenses for the new mount can be considerably smaller than current Four Thirds designs. The format will require framing to be carried out using Live View on either the LCD monitor or an EVF. Existing Four Thirds lenses can be used on Micro Four Thirds cameras using an adapter.

Lens compatibility

Micro Four Thirds is an extension of the Four Thirds standard that Olympus, Leica and Panasonic have used for their recent DSLRs. An adaptor ring is available, allowing existing Four Thirds lenses to be mounted. Auto Focus only functions on lenses compatible with contrast-detect AF, which limits choice. Click here for an up-to-date list of compatible lenses on the Panasonic website.

The DMW-MA1APP adapter allows existing Four Thirds lenses to be used with the Micro Four Thirds mount. The adapter is not designed to work with other accessories, such as tele-converters and extension tubes.
Using the adaptor, the G1/GH1 can mount the full range of legacy Four Thirds lenses. However, the camera's smaller size can result in combinations that are less well balanced than would be the case with Four Thirds DSLRs.

Lens Roadmap

Panasonic originally released this lens roadmap for Micro Four Thirds when the G1 was announced. By now (July 2009) all the lenses on the map apart from the 20mm F1.7 have been launched. Additionally Olympus has announced two Micro Four Thirds lenses with the E-P1- a 14-42mm F3.5-5.6 and a 17mm F2.8.

Multi-aspect ratio

Like the Panasonic LX3 compact camera the GH1 now uses a multi-aspect ratio sensor. At any aspect ratio (even at 4:3) it only uses a crop from the total available sensor surface which is slightly larger than a standard Four Thirds sensor in order to accomodate the different aspect ratios. At first sight this may seem strange but the result is that the lens offers the same diagonal angle of view regardless of selected aspect ratio, making it much easier to get a feel for the behaviour of the lens. It also means you make the most of the sensor area, getting similar pixel counts in all modes.


The image on the left shows the result of shooting the same scene at the same zoom setting using different aspect ratios. As you can see all three shots end up with the same angle of view.

Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH1 specifications

Price (with 14-140 mm kit lens) • US: $1499
• UK: £1299
Body material Plastic
Sensor • 4/3 type MOS ('Live MOS sensor')
• 14.0 million total pixels
• 12.1 million effective pixels
• RGB (Primary) color filter array
Image sizes • 4000 x 3000 (4:3)
• 2816 x 2112 (4:3)
• 2048 x 1536 (4:3)
• 4128 x 2752 (3:2)
• 2928 x 1952 (3:2)
• 2064 x 1376 (3:2)
• 4352 x 2448 (16:9)
• 3072 x 1728 (16:9)
• 1920 x 1080 (16:9)
• 2992 x 2992 (1:1)
• 2112 x 2112 (1:1)
• 1504 x 1504 (1:1)
Image sizes (Motion) • AVCHD :
1920 x 1080, 24fps (24 fps encapsulated in a 60i format)
1280 x 720 (60 fps)
• Motion JPEG:
1280 x 720, 30fps
848 x 480, 30fps
640 x 480, 30fps
320 x 240, 30fps
Aspect ratios • 4:3
• 3:2
• 1:1
• 16:9
File formats • RAW
• RAW + JPEG Standard
• RAW + JPEG Fine
• JPEG (EXIF 2.2) - Standard
• JPEG (EXIF 2.2) - Fine
File formats (Movie) • AVCHD
• QuickTime Motion JPEG
Lenses

• Micro Four Thirds mount lenses
• Four Thirds mount lenses via adapter DMW-MA1PP (AF not available with all lenses)

Focus modes • Auto Focus
• Manual focus
• Face Detection
• AF Tracking
• 23-Area-Focusing/1 Area Focusing
AF assist lamp Yes, dedicated lamp
Image stabilization In-lens Optical Image Stabilization
Digital zoom • Up to 4x
Exposure modes • Program AE
• Aperture priority AE
• Shutter priority AE
• Manual
• Auto
Scene modes

• Portrait
• Soft Skin
• Outdoor Portrait
• Indoor Portrait
• Creative Portrait
• Scenery
• Nature
• Architecture
• Creative Scenery
• Sports
• Outdoor Sports
• Indoor Sports
• Creative Sports
• Flower
• Food
• Objects
• Creative Close-Up
• Night Portrait
• Night Scenery
• Illuminations
• Creative Night Scenery
• Sunset
• Party
• Baby 1,2
• Pet

Movie scene modes • Portrait
• Scenery
• Sports
• Low Light
• Close-up (Flower/Food/Objects/Macro)
• SCN (Sunset/Party/Portrait)
Sensitivity

• Auto
• Intelligent ISO
• ISO 100
• ISO 200
• ISO 400
• ISO 800
• ISO 1600
• ISO 3200

Metering range 0 to 18 EV
Metering modes • Intelligent Multiple
• Center-Weighted
• Spot
AE Lock • AEL/AFL button
• With shutter release half-press
AE Bracketing • 3,5,7 frames
• 1/3 or 2/3 , +/-2.0 EV steps
Exposure compensation • -3.0 to +3.0 EV
• 1/3 EV steps
Shutter speed • 60 -1/4000 sec
• Bulb (up to 8 mins)
• Flash X-sync 1/160 sec
White balance • Auto
• Daylight
• Cloudy
• Shade
• Halogen
• Flash
• Custom 1
• Custom 2
• Kelvin temp (2500 - 10000 K, 100K steps)
WB fine tuning Yes (blue/amber bias, magenta/green bias)
WB Bracketing • 3 shots
•+/-1 to +/-3 in either blue/amber or magenta/green axis
Color space • sRGB
• Adobe RGB
Image parameters

• Color mode (Standard, Dynamic, Nature, Smooth, Vibrant, Nostalgic)
• Saturation (5 levels)
• Contrast (5 levels)
• Sharpness (5 levels)
• Noise reduction (5 levels)
• Monochrome (Standard, Dynamic, Smooth)
• My Film (2 memories)
• Multi-film bracketing

Drive modes • Single
• Continuous H (3 fps)
• Continuous L (2 fps)
Continuous buffer • 7 RAW images
• Unlimited JPEG images with a fast card
Self-timer • 2 sec
• 10 sec
• 10 sec, 3 images
Flash • Manual pop-up
• TTL auto / manual
• Guide no. 10.5 (ISO 100, m)
• Sync modes: Auto, On, Off, Red-eye reduction, Slow syncro with red-eye reduction, Slow syncro
• Flash power: Up to +/- 2EV in 1/3 EV steps
Flash X-sync speed 1/160 sec
External flash • Hot shoe
• TTL Auto with FL220/FL360/FL500 (Optional)
Viewfinder • Electronic Viewfinder
• Color LCD Viewfinder
• Field of view 100%
• Eye point 14 mm at -1 dioptre
• Magnification 1.4x (equivalent to 0.7x on a 35mm camera / 50mm lens)
• Dioptre adjustment -4 to +4 dioptre
• 1,440,000 dots
• Field Sequential (RGB)
DOF preview Yes
Orientation sensor Yes
LCD monitor • 3.0" TFT LCD monitor
• Multi-angle swing and tilt (180°swing, 180° swivel)
• Low temperature Polycrystalline TFT LCD
• 460,000 dots
• 60 fps
• Approx 100% frame coverage
• Auto Power LCD (optional) adjusts brightness in bright light
Playback functions • Single
• Magnify (2 - 16x)
• Index (4-25 frames)
• Calendar view
• Resize
• Trimming
• Aspect Conversion
Connectivity • USB 2.0 (High Speed)
• Video Out (NTSC / PAL)
• Wired remote control DMW-RSL1 (optional)
• HDMI
Print compliance • PictBridge
• DPOF
Storage SD / SDHC / MMC
Power • 1250 mAh 7.2v Lithium-Ion rechargeable battery
• Supplied charger / AC adapter
Dimensions 124 mm x 90mm x 45 mm
Weight (camera body) Approx. 385g / 13.58 oz
Weight (inc supplied lens, card and battery) Approx. 904 g / 31.89 oz

Design

Apart from a slightly larger 'faux prism' (to house the stereo microphones) the GH1 is the G1's identical twin. The camera is in every dimension smaller than arguably the smallest DSLR that is currently on the market, the Olympus E-450, which is one of the benefits promised by Micro Four Thirds' elimination of the reflex mirror. From a design point of view it is, in almost every respect, very careful to mimic DSLR design, with a large grip and command dial embedded in the front of it. And the result is a camera that will be instantly familiar to DSLR users and, perhaps more importantly, one that is consistent with the expectations of users aspiring to own a DSLR.

The soft micro-textured finish and overall build quality make the camera feel anything but 'cheap' (though a little more 'grip' or texture to the surface would be nice - there was some slight concern that the current texture felt slightly plasticy).

In your hand / grip

Despite its small size the GH1 features a respectably sized grip that fits well in the hand and puts both the shutter button and mode dial in easy reach. The 'push and turn' control dial avoids the need for any buttons to be held down when changing settings, meaning the AF/AE Lock button can be placed very conveniently. With the 14-140mm lens mounted the GH1 feels reassuringly 'dense' - it's certainly heavy enough to feel solid and stable in the hand.

Side by side

Below you can see the GH1's dimensions compared to a typical entry level DSLR, the Canon EOS 500D, with equivalent lenses (14-140mm F4.0-5.8 on the GH1 and 18-200mm F3.5-5.6 on the 500D). As you can see shooting with a Micro Four Thirds system combination means a fairly significant saving in terms of dimensions compared to an equivalent DSLR/lens combination.



LCD Monitor

Like the G1, the GH1 has a 3.0" wide screen display built onto a hinge that allows it to swivel and tilt. The LCD is made up of 460,000 dots, making it one of the higher-resolution examples available. While in resolution terms it's not quite on a par with the VGA screens that have almost become standard on DSLRs its 60fps refresh rate produces a much smoother live view image than on most DSLRs the GH1 would be competing with. The screen can be turned around completely ('face in') to protect it when not in use. The images below show the swivel screen of the G1 which works in exactly the same way as the GH1's.

Electronic Viewfinder

Possibly the biggest barrier to acceptance of the idea of a non-reflex 'SLR' has been the lack of an electronic eye-level display that can come close to offering the clarity of a traditional mirror, focusing screen and pentaprism/mirror system. The GH1's electronic viewfinder uses single-panel LED-illuminated Direct-view LCOS (liquid crystal on silicon) technology, and is based on Panasonic's professional high-end system video cameras.

According to Panasonic LCOS technology can produce much higher resolution images than liquid crystal display or plasma display technologies. Compared to conventional LCDs in which the back light is projected through RGB filters and into the eye, in LCOS, liquid crystals are applied directly to the surface of a silicon chip coated with a highly reflective aluminized layer. RGB light is then reflected off this surface and into the eye, therefore minimizing overall color loss often associated with the low quality of color filters in conventional LCDs. This allows the GH1's Live Viewfinder to achieve over 90% of the NTSC color gamut (this, apparently, is unusually high).

The GH1's single panel display chip shows the red, green and blue components in succession (field sequential display) - your brain does the combining to produce the full color image. This means you can't see the individual pixels - there's no gap between them (there's no mesh surrounding the color filters such as in conventional LCD displays). The viewfinder is able to refresh the three RGB colors at a rate of 60Hz, therefore achieving the 60fps Full-Time Live View.

We've certainly been impressed by the unit. There's still the slight color 'tearing' if you move your eye too quickly (something common to all field sequential viewfinders we've tried), but the sharpness, resolution, refresh rate, brightness and color are excellent. The real revelation is when you try it next to the Olympus E-450 (using our tried and tested method of putting a camera up to each eye); the GH1's viewfinder image looks huge, and a lot brighter with a standard zoom attached. There's no doubt that electronic viewfinders aren't going to replace optical reflex finders for all applications in the near future (the display gets quite noisy and the refresh rate drops to a rather 'jerky' level in very low light, and it will inevitably impact on shutter lag), but this is a real move in the right direction - it's perfectly possible to check critical focus using the EVF, and there seems to be very little video lag.

Next to the eyepiece there's a sensor that automatically switches between the main screen and the EVF when you put your eye to the viewfinder (there's a slight delay - but we're only talking a fraction of a second).

Viewfinder view

In keeping with the GH1's aim of behaving exactly like a DSLR, the EVF very closely mimics the appearance of a DSLR. And, unlike DSLRs with Live view, the layout of the information is consistent between the viewfinder and the rear LCD (unless you're using the Status Panel mode on the rear screen). The result is no hunting around for settings - they're always shown in the same place. And, unlike a DSLR, the GH1's viewfinder can show you the options for each setting, rather than just reflecting the current settings. The diagram below shows the detailed view.

1 Flash setting 11 AF mode
2 Film mode 12 Metering mode
3 Optical Image Stabilization mode 13 Recording mode
4 Drive mode (blank in single frame mode) 14 Aperture
5 Movie record quality 15 Shutter speed
6 Picture size/ aspect ratio 16 Exposure indicator
7 Quality setting 17 Sensitivity setting
8 Power LCD mode 18 White Balance
9 Intelligent exposure 19 Frames remaining
10 Battery status 20 Focus confirmation

Viewfinder size

One figure hidden away in every SLR's spec is the size of the viewfinder (often in a format that makes comparison between competing models impossible). The size of the viewfinder is a key factor in the usability of an SLR - the bigger it is, the easier it is to frame and focus your shots, and the more enjoyable and involving process it is.

Because of the way viewfinders are measured (using a fixed lens, rather than a lens of equivalent magnification), you also need to take the sensor size into account, so the numbers in the diagram below are the manufacturer's specified magnifications divided by the respective 'crop factors'. Of course the GH1 does not feature an optical viewfinder but comes with an electronic variant instead. However, the same rules apply. Hence the GH1's quoted figure of 1.4x magnification ends up as 0.7x when compared to a full-frame, 24x36mm sensor camera.

The diagram below shows the relative size of the viewfinders of the GH1, E-620 and Canon EOS 500D, alongside, for reference, the EOS-1Ds Mark III (currently the biggest viewfinder on the DSLR market).

Thanks to its impressive 1.4x magnification the GH1's electronic viewfinder produces a view that gets in terms of dimensions pretty close to a full-frame DSLR and is significantly larger than what you get on a APS-C or Four Thirds DSLR.

The GH1 also shows 100% of the frame while most DSLRs crop a few percent off the edges of the frame.

Camera settings display

There are three different types of display that can be brought up while shooting images with the GH1. "LCD monitor" mode looks most like a compact camera display, with icons overlaid on the image. "Finder mode" is very similar but places a black bar across the bottom of the screen, to make it more familiar to DSLR users used to using an optical viewfinder with a status bar along the bottom. Finally, there's a status panel of the type that has become common on entry-level DSLRs.

The 'Finder' style view retains a black strip along the bottom of the screen to mimic the behavior of an optical viewfinder. Unlike an optical finder, however, it can re-size the view to match the aspect ratio (4:3, 3:2 or 16:9) Status panel mode behaves just like the other modes, with the Q.Menu button being used to access the different settings.

Battery Compartment / Battery

The GH1 comes with the same battery as the G1. It has a 1250mAh, 7.2V battery, meaning it can deliver 9.0Wh, in excess of the power output we've seen from recent entry-level DSLRs with small batteries (though, of course, it's reasonable to assume the GH1 will draw more power than those cameras, unless they're used in their Live view modes).

Battery life is around 300 shots (CIPA standard) or 150 minutes of video recording. This can vary depending on whether you use the electronic viewfinder or the slightly more power-hungry LCD screen - this is similar to most digital SLRs used in live view mode (though of course here you don't have the option of an optical finder to extend battery life). In these days of 8GB SD cards it's easy to shoot that many pictures in a day, so a spare battery might be a good idea.

Battery Charger

The GH1 uses Panasonic's DMW-BLB13PP battery. The DE-A49C charger also offers a 9.3V DC output that the optional DC cable/dummy battery (DMW-DCC3) can be plugged into.

Secure Digital Compartment

Like most of cameras at this end of the market, the GH1 accepts the popular SD format of memory card (including the larger capacity SDHC variety). The card slot sits under a sturdy slide-out spring-bound door (there's no lock but the door is stiff enough to avoid accidental opening).

Connections

On the left hand side of the camera is a combined USB/video out connector and a HDMI port for connection to your HDTV. No HDMI cable is included with the camera, however, so that's something you may need to invest it. There is also an external microphone socket.


Base / Tripod Mount

The GH1 has a metal tripod mount, which should reduce concerns about stripping its thread. It's perfectly lined up with the lens but the camera is so small that you can give up on the idea of changing batteries with most tripod plates attached.

Pop-up Flash

The GH1's rather small flash has a Guide Number of just 10.5, rather than the 12 or 13 we're used to seeing on entry-level DSLRs. The flash synch speed is 1/160 sec. Due to the slightly bulky kit lens at wide angle the lens partially shades the flash. However, the problem disappears pretty quickly as you zoom in a little.

AF Assist

The GH1 has a small orange lamp on its left shoulder, meaning you don't have to flip the flash to gain focus in low light. It's not the most discreet solution but it's less disturbing than having a strobing flash pointed at you.

Flash Hot-shoe

The GH1 includes a hot shoe that will work with the dedicated DMW-FL220 flash unit.

Lens Mount

After the G1 the the GH1 is the second camera to make use of the new, miniaturized Micro Four Thirds mount. Remove the lens and you'll be confronted with an exposed sensor - it's of the familiar Four Thirds size but rather disconcerting to see it in the nude. The focal plane shutter stays open until the point an exposure is made.

The sensor is of conventional Four Thirds size but is left exposed when the lens is removed. Panasonic appears to have concluded that the low-pass filter assembly in front of the sensor is more resilient than the shutter mechanism. It'll be interesting to see if this practice continues or other designs introduce some kind of Safety Curtain that activates when the lens is removed (though it could be that we're worrying too much).

Supplied In the Box

The GH1 will initially be available as a kit with the LUMIX G VARIO HD 14-140mm / F4.0-5.8 ASPH. / MEGA O.I.S. lens. The camera is available in black, red or gold.

The DMC GH1 kit is supplied as:

  • Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH1 body
  • LUMIX G VARIO HD 14-140mm / F4.0-5.8 ASPH. / MEGA O.I.S. lens
  • BLB13PP Lithium-Ion battery pack
  • DE-A49C battery charger
  • AC cable
  • Video cable
  • USB connection cable
  • Software CD
  • Strap
  • Lens hood
  • Lens cap
  • Lens rear cap
  • Lens storage bag
  • Body cap
  • Manuals

Top of camera controls

The top right of the camera is, apart from the movie mode icon on the model dial, identical to the G1. It will also be very familiar to users of Panasonic's L10 DSLR - the cluster of controls is very similar, and it's nice to see some levers (for the power switch and drive mode) - they give the camera a traditional feel. Aside from the main mode dial there's also two buttons that are used to bring up on-screen menus. In the top right corner of the camera rear you can see a new addition to the GH1 - the motion picture button. You can press it any time, no matter what shooting mode you are in, to start/stop video recording.

Mode Dial

Position
Function

Intelligent Auto Mode

Basic 'point and shoot' mode with pretty much every setting fixed on automatic. Activates Panasonic's full arsenal of clever 'Intelligent' features:
• Auto Scene Detection
• Digital Red Eye removal
• Face Detection
• Intelligent ISO (increases ISO if subject motion detected)
• Intelligent Exposure (lightens shadows in contrasty situations)

When recording video in Intelligent Auto Mode the camera will select set the most appropriate settings for subject and light conditions automatically. This includes all of the above 'intelligent' features.

P Programmed Auto (Flexible)

The Program AE on the GH1 has 'program shift' functionality. This means that you can select one of a variety of equal exposures by turning the front command dial left or right. Minimum shutter speed is 60 seconds, top speed is 1/4000 second.
Example:

• 1/160 F3.2 (turn CCW a click)
• 1/125 F3.5 (turn CCW a click)
• 1/100 F4.0 (metered)
• 1/80 F5.0 (turn CW a click)
• 1/60 F5.6 (turn CW a click)

When recording video in 'P' mode aperture and shutter speed are selected automatically.

A Aperture Priority Auto

In this mode you select the aperture and the camera will calculate the shutter speed for the exposure (depending on metered value; metering mode, ISO). Aperture is displayed on the viewfinder status bar and the LCD monitor, turn the front dial to select different apertures. A half-press of the shutter release causes the cameras exposure system to calculate the shutter speed, if it's outside of the cameras exposure range the shutter speed will blink.

• Range depends on lens max. and min. apertures, in 1/3 EV or 1.0 steps

When recording video in 'A' mode aperture and shutter speed are selected automatically.

S Shutter Priority Auto

In this mode you select the shutter speed and the camera will calculate the correct aperture for the exposure (depending on metered value; metering mode, ISO). Shutter speed is displayed in the viewfinder and the LCD monitor, turn the front dial to select different shutter speeds. A half-press of the shutter release causes the cameras exposure system to calculate the aperture.

• 60 seconds - 1/4000 sec (in 1/3 or 1 EV steps)

When recording video in 'S' mode aperture and shutter speed are selected automatically.

M

Full Manual Exposure

In this mode you select the aperture and the shutter speed from any combination of the above (and additionally Bulb shutter). Turn the front dial to adjust aperture and shutter speed (toggle between the two by pressing the dial). The viewfinder/LCD display will indicate how close you are to the metered exposure (+/- 3 EV).

When recording video in 'M' mode aperture and shutter speed are selected automatically.

Creative Motion Picture mode

In this mode you can chose from P,A,S and M modes for video recording and set aperture and/or shutter speed, ISO and a range of other shooting parameters manually.

CUST

Custom Mode

You can save up to three sets of custom settings for immediate recall. You can also record video in this mode.

Advanced Scene mode : Portrait

Allows the selection of one of four scene modes, each with slightly different parameters (all aim to minimize depth of field and produce flattering skin tones):

  • Normal Portrait
  • Soft Skin (digitally softens skin tones)
  • Outdoor portrait
  • Indoor Portrait (Intelligent ISO active)
  • Creative Portrait (allows user to set aperture)

When recording video in this mode the camera will use the selected Portrait settings.

Advanced Scene mode : Scenery

Allows the selection of one of four scene modes, each with slightly different parameters:

  • Normal Scenery
  • Nature
  • Architecture
  • Creative Scenery (allows user to set shutter speed)

When recording video in this mode the camera will use the selected Scenery settings.

Advanced Scene mode : Sports

Allows the selection of one of four scene modes, each with slightly different parameters:

  • Normal Sports
  • Outdoor Sports
  • Indoor Sports
  • Creative Sports (allows user to set shutter speed)

When recording video in this mode the camera will use the selected Sports settings.

Advanced Scene mode : Close Up

Allows the selection of one of three scene modes, each with slightly different parameters:

  • Flower
  • Food
  • Objects
  • Creative Close Up (allows user to set aperture)

When recording video in this mode the camera will use the selected Close-up settings.

Advanced Scene mode : Night Portrait

Allows the selection of one of four scene modes, each with slightly different parameters:

  • Night Portrait
  • Night Scenery
  • Illuminations
  • Creative Night Scenery (allows user to set aperture)

When recording video in this mode the camera will use the selected Night portrait settings.

SCN

Scene mode

Designed to match the camera settings to several (very) specific shooting scenarios:

  • Sunset
  • Food
  • Baby 1/2 (includes ability to record child's birthday for display of age in playback mode or in supplied software)
  • Pet (also allows you to set the age of your pet...).

When recording video in this mode the camera will use the selected Scene mode settings.

My Color Mode

Allows you to experiment with different colors and tonality with 11-step sliders for the following:

  • Color (hue)
  • Brightness
  • Saturation

You can also record video in My Color mode.

Buttons / Switches

Button/switch
Options / description
ON/OFF Main Power Switch

• On
• Off
Drive

Drive mode

• Single shot
• Continuous drive
• Bracketing
• Self-timer
Q.MENU Quick Menu

Activates the Quick Menu, which allows you to select and change any of the settings shown as on-screen icons.
FILM
MODE

Film Mode

Pressing the Film Mode button allows you to choose from nine preset 'film modes', or to individually set four parameters (contrast, sharpness, saturation* and noise reduction). You can save custom settings into one of two 'My Film' registers. *not in B&W modes

Film modes:
• Standard (color)
• Dynamic (color)
• Nature (color)
• Smooth (color)
• Nostalgic (color)
• Vibrant (color)
• Standard (B&W)
• Dynamic (B&W)
• Smooth (B&W)
• My Film1
• My Film2
• Multi Film (1,2 and 3)

Front dial

Used to change exposure settings and navigate menus. In play mode turning the dial changes magnification and activates the thumbnail views.

Left-hand side

The left shoulder of the camera is home to the focus mode dial (which we can't help but feel isn't the best use of this space; for most photographers it would probably be more useful to control ISO or even shutter speeds on this dial) plus the flash release and a switch for manually flipping between the screen and viewfinder.

Buttons / switches

Button
Operation
AFS
AFC
MF
Focus mode dial

• Auto Focus Single-shot
• Auto Focus Continuous
• Manual Focus
OPEN Flash up

Press this button to release the pop-up flash.

Lens barrel controls (MEGA O.I.S.)

On the side of the GH1's kit lens is the OIS on/off switch. The lens uses the same moving lens element optical stabilization as Panasonic's compact Lumix cameras and offers three modes (changed using the Quick Menu):

  • Mode 1 (IS operates continuously)
  • Mode 2 (IS operates only when the shutter is depressed
  • Mode 3 (vertical correction only: panning mode)

Rear of camera controls

The GH1's rear controls are, with the exception of the bright red video button in the top right corner, identical to the G1. They are also similar to the L10, with a bit of the FZ series thrown in for good measure. Top left is the EVF/LCD button to toggle between framing with the viewfinder and the LCD screen. To the right of the viewfinder we have the AE/AF lock and play mode buttons, and in the far right the video button. Below the thumb grip you can find DISPLAY (for changing the amount and type of information overlaid on the live view and playback displays). Below this is the standard four-way controller. Each of the directional keys has a dedicated function in record mode, giving direct access to ISO speed, focus pattern and white balance, plus a customizable function button (Fn). Bottom right of the back is the depth-of-field preview button (which doubles up as a Delete button in playback mode).

On screen settings adjustment

Buttons such as white balance and ISO display a dedicated mini menu on the LCD monitor/EVF which allow you to see all the options available, use the command dial or arrow keys to change. Of course there are plenty of other ways to change settings using the various display options (see here for more detail).

It's worth reiterating that Micro Four Thirds cameras do live view 'right' in a way we've not seen before. In the majority of DSLRs it's appeared a little bit bolted-on, with relatively limited functionality (e.g. autofocus) and no clear idea of what it is there for. Even the more integrated systems have come at the expense of traditional DSLR capabilities, such as the viewfinder. By contrast, the GH1 behaves exactly like a DSLR despite being built around Live view.

Setting AF mode example Setting ISO example

Status panel display

Instead of having a live view image on your rear LCD you can opt for displaying the status panel which acts much like it does on most modern DSLRs - all the most important settings are displayed using icons. Press the Q.Menu button and use the front dial (or arrow keys) to select the setting you want to change, then press the dial to change the setting (this brings up a dedicated sub-menu). It's a fast and efficient way to use the camera (note that the EVF continues to show the live view when you're using the Status Panel display mode on the main screen, so you can use the camera much as you would a conventional SLR.

Pressing the front dial toggles between the main setting (in this case aperture, since we're in Aperture Priority mode) and AE compensation. Turning the dial changes the setting.
Press the Q.Menu button to switch focus to the bank of settings on the left. Use the dial or arrow keys to select the parameter you want to change. Press the dial again (or the SET button) to bring up a screen of options, select the setting you want (again using the dial or arrow keys) and simply press the dial or SET button to set it. It's fast, fluid and simple - and if you raise the camera to your eye the display switches to the viewfinder, back in normal live view mode.
There's a total of three different color options for the status panel display.

Quick Menu (Q.Menu)

The GH1 offers direct access to most of the most common settings using the Quick Menu (found on most modern Lumix compacts). Pressing the Q.Menu button lets you select a setting from the icons arranged around the live view screen and change it. The exact appearance of the quick menu settings depends on which display mode you are in.

Changing image size in the three different display modes (the operation is identical in each case; it's just the display that's different).

Buttons / controls

Button
Function
Motion Picture button

Starts and stops video recording. The button can be deactivated in the menu.
EVF/LCD

EVF/LCD toggle button

Used to switch between the viewfinder and screen if the auto switching function is turned off.

AF/AE LOCK

Auto Focus / Auto Exposure Lock

The AFL / AEL button is used to measure exposure and auto focus and then lock them. This can either be momentary (while the button is held down) or optionally toggled, where you simply tap the button and focus and exposure remain locked until the AFL / AEL button is pressed again. The Custom menu allows you to define whether the button operates as an AF, AE or AF/AE lock.

Four-way controller

In shooting mode the four arrow keys each have a dedicated function (listed below). The directional keys are also used to navigate menus and change settings. In playback mode the left and right keys are used to scroll through saved images.
WB White Balance (right arrow)

• Auto
• Daylight
• Cloudy
• Shade
• Halogen
• Flash
• Custom 1
• Custom 2
• Kelvin temp (2500 - 10000 K, 100K steps)
ISO

ISO Sensitivity (up arrow)

• Auto (not in M mode)
• Intelligent ISO (not in M mode)
• ISO 100
• ISO 200
• ISO 400
• ISO 800
• ISO 1600
• ISO 3200

Focus Mode

• Single area (press SET to use cursor keys to set AF point)
• 23 area (auto select)
• Subject Tracking AF
• Face Detect AF
Fn

Fn (down arrow)

The FUNC button can be customized to offer direct access to any of the following controls:
• Aspect ratio
• Quality
• Metering Mode
• i.Exposure
• Guide lines
• Recording area display
• Remaining minutes/frames display switch

Play mode

Enters or leaves play mode, the GH1 is a shooting priority camera which means you can always return to play mode by half-pressing the shutter release button.

DISPLAY

Display mode

In record mode toggles between three different display options on the main screen (screen off, status panel display, normal live view)

In play mode cycles through the various information display modes.

Erase / Depth of field preview

In Record mode pressing this button closes down the lens aperture to the selected value allowing depth of field to be previewed. Offers option to view 'Shutter Speed Effect' preview.

In Play mode displays a 'Yes / No' confirmation dialog to delete the current image, press the Erase button again to switch to All/Multi mode; Multi allowing you to select images on a 6 image thumbnail index, All erasing all images on the storage card (except for Protected images).

MENU/
SET

Menu / Set

Press to enter the Menu in any mode, also used to confirm menu settings.


Live View

While live view on DSLRs still often looks like something that has been bolted on after a last minute request from the marketing department (for instance, in most cases the AF is so slow that it's not usable at all for moving subjects), the GH1 is a camera that has been designed around live view from the beginning and it shows. With the dedicated Micro Four Thirds lenses the GH1's contrast detect AF is as quick as the 'traditional' phase detect systems on most DSLRs. Operation is always coherent and not too dissimilar to Panasonic's compact cameras.

Live view display modes

On the GH1 you can chose between a viewfinder and LCD type display and you can set those independently for the EVF and the rear LCD. Commendably, the behavior in all screen modes is remarkably consistent - the command dial controls exposure compensation in most 'scene' modes, or one of the shooting parameters in the 'P, A, S and M' modes. In these modes, pressing the command dial toggles to control exposure compensation, the other shooting shooting parameter or program shift, depending on the mode. Accessing the other settings just requires pressing the Q.Menu button at which point the arrow keys or command dial allow navigation and a press of the 'set' button or command dial engages the setting.

Note that not all settings are available in all modes (Scene modes and Intelligent Auto modes have a reduced set of options).

LCD mode with detailed shooting information and histogram Viewfinder mode with detailed shooting information

No shooting information Grid type I
Grid type II Grid type III

One really neat feature is the ability to position the live histogram anywhere in the frame. You can also add framing guides (including custom guides you position yourself).

Live view magnification

Just as in playback mode you can magnify live view by pressing the enlarge button (or back out again with reduce). While magnified you can use the multi-controller to move around the live image.

The live view can, naturally, be magnified.

Live view Depth-of-Field preview

One very useful feature is depth-of-field (DOF) preview. When the DOF preview button is pressed the camera stops the lens down to the selected aperture which provides you with an accurate representation of the depth-of-field of the final image. This system has advantages over the optical viewfinder in that it doesn't darken and can correctly represent the effects of large maximum apertures.

One totally unique (as far as we know) feature is the G1/GH1's shutter speed effect preview. This changes the refresh rate of the live view to mimic the shutter speed selected, producing a fairly accurate representation of how blurred subject movement will be in the final shot. This is exactly the kind of feature that shows how a truly 'ground up' digital camera system can offer significant advantages over the current crop of 'one foot in the past' digital SLRs.

Normal Live View DOF preview button held at F22
Press Display to preview the effect of the current shutter speed (here the spinning players appear as a total blur). This isn't a still; it's a live view with blurring.

Other options

The introduction of live view to SLRs has seen an increase in the prevalence of compact camera-like features and the ability to preview parameter changes on the image. The GH1, as a live view only system camera, has more than its fair share of toys and (inevitably, this being Panasonic) a plethora of scene and subject modes.

Pressing the Film Mode button brings up this menu from where you can choose one of six color and three black & white color modes. In each case you can also change the contrast, sharpness, saturation (color modes only) and noise reduction in 5 steps (from -2 to +2). There are two 'My Film' memory registers for creating and saving custom color modes. A final 'Multi Film' mode offers film mode 'bracketing' (up to three shots in your choice of film mode). My Color mode (accessed from the main mode dial) offers a quick way to experiment with three tonal parameters; Color (hue), Brightness and Saturation. In each case you get an 11 step (-5 to +5) range to play with.
As with most recent Panasonic compacts there are five 'Advanced Scene Modes' (again accessed from the mode dial) - Portrait, Scenery, Sports, Close-up and Night Portrait. Each of these has four or five sub sections with more specialized subject modes. With any scene mode selected pressing the DISPLAY button brings up a short description of the mode. The Scene mode (SCN on the mode dial) offers five rather specialized options: Sunset, Party, Baby 1, Baby 2 and Pet (the last three give the option to overlay the age of the child or chihuahua on the shot).

Contrast Detect AF

Aside from the viewfinder, our biggest worry about the viability of the GH1 - and all non-reflex interchangeable lens cameras - is the reliance on sensor-based contrast detect autofocus. Our experiences so far - with the live view modes on current DSLRs - haven't been promising; all are painfully slow and most are close to unusable for any non-static subject.

When we visited Panasonic in Osaka last year to talk about the development of Micro Four Thirds we were assured that our concerns would be unfounded; this is a system designed from first principles on the basis of live view only operation, and a lot of work has gone into the design of new contrast detect focus algorithms. This, we were told, along with the extra processing power of the new Venus HD engine, would mean contrast detect AF that was at least as fast as current entry-level digital SLRs using the traditional phase detect AF.

The good news is that Panasonic's engineers have kept true to their word; the focus is not only astonishingly fast for a contrast detect system; it's easily as fast as any conventional SLR in this class. And unlike even most mid-range SLRs you get 23 area auto AF and the ability to place a single AF point almost anywhere in the frame - and that's before you throw in Panasonic's remarkable subject tracking AF and Face Detection. Panasonic seems to have overcome the main problem currently associated with using live view on an SLR (focus speed) and in so doing produced a truly usable live view-only camera.

Focus modes

The GH1 offers four focus modes; Face Detection, AF Tracking, 23-area-focusing and 1-area focusing.

In Face Detection mode the camera will identify and lock onto a human face. In single area AF mode you can set both the position (using the SET button then the arrow keys) and the size (using the dial) of the chosen area.
In 23-area AF the camera automatically selects the right area(s) of the scene from 23 points. Panasonic's unique AF Tracking mode starts with a central focus area.
Half press and the focus point will 'lock on' to the subject. Even if the subject - or the camera - moves, the focus point will continue to track it. It works well and is very fast.

Manual Focus

Manual focus is performed using the focus ring on the lens. If you've activated the MF assist function the image will be magnified to 5x or 10x as soon as you turn the focus ring. It's surprisingly usable.

Live view AF video clip

Below you will find a (very) short video clip showing the contrast detect autofocus in action. The clip starts a fraction of a second before the half-press activation of the focus system (with the focus preset to infinity) and ends after the 3 second record review has ended and the live view has returned. As you can see, the focus moves very quickly from infinity to its closest focus point.

Please note that this video has been taken from the Panasonic G1 review. The AF operation on the GH1 is identical.

Overall handling and operation comments

The GH1 is smaller than even the smallest DSLRs but, thanks to its good sized grip and reassuring weight, always feels solid and stable in your hand. From a control interface point of view the Panasonic offers the best of two worlds. You can use it almost exactly in the same way as you would use an SLR, with your eye to the viewfinder and controlling the settings via the various external controls; despite being built around Live view the GH1 will behave in pretty much the same way. However, if you're upgrading from a compact camera and don't want to change the way you operate your camera, you can simply use the LCD to frame a shot and control settings on-screen via the Quick Menu and status display, just as you would on a compact. The GH1 offers various control options and you simply pick the one that suits you best.

While on the new generation of movie-enabled DSLRs the operation of the movie mode can not always exactly be called straightforward, on the GH1 the motion picture capability has been integrated with the stills image controls almost seamlessly. The movie button at the rear of the camera can be pressed at any time, without turning a mode dial into movie position, to start and stop recording. Video is often shot from a slightly lower position and therefore the swivel screen, which can occasionally be useful for taking still images, suddenly becomes a must-have feature, although in bright sunlight the electronic viewfinder makes a viable alternative.

All in all, the entire user interface including menus has an intuitive and concise design and within a few days of shooting with the GH1 you'll know your way around the camera very well and will probably have developed your individual 'style of operation' using a mixture of external and Quick Menu controls.

Displays

Record Review

You cannot change the type of record review screen (it doesn't for example match the current play mode display setting), but you can choose to have the record review 'zoom in' to maximum magnification and can set the duration of the thumbnail and magnified displays independently (i.e. you can say 'show the full image for 3 seconds followed by the magnified image for 1 second).

Playback

Display modes

The GH1 provides four different display modes in playback, press the DISPLAY button to cycle through them. You can have blinking highlights (this in an option you have to turn on in the setup menu) and RGB histograms and the usual array of shooting information.

1. Full screen image with no information 2. Full screen image with information overlaid
3: Small image, full shooting information 4. Small image, basic shooting information and R,G,B and Luminance histograms

Play magnification

In play mode the front control wheel is used to change the magnification (up to 16 steps) and the arrow keys to scroll around the magnified image.

Play thumbnail index

Turn the command dial counter-clockwise to switch to thumbnail index views, there are three different index views; 12 images (3x4), 30 images (6x5) and a useful calendar view which allows you to browse your images by the date they were taken.


Camera Menus

The GH1 fits its many options onto 20 pages of menus. These are divided into six categories: Record, Motion Picture, Custom Menu, Setup, the customizable My Menu and Playback. Generally you'll find all the options where you'd expect them and, after a short while with the GH1, navigating the menus is easy.

Note that you get a much smaller subset of menus in full Auto mode.

Record menu

Option Values / Actions Notes
Aspect Ratio • 4:3
• 3:2
• 16:9
• 1:1

- 4000 x 3000/2816 x 2112/2048 x 1536 - 4128 x 2752/2928 x 1952/2064 x 1376
- 4352 x 2448/3072 x 1728/1920 x 1080
- 2992 x 2992/2112 x 2112/1504 x 1504

Picture Size • Large
• Medium
• Small
Quality • Fine
• Standard
• RAW + Fine
• RAW + Standard
• RAW
RAW mode stores only the maximum number of pixels of your chosen aspect ratio, not necessarily the entire sensor.
Face Recognition • Off
• On
• Memory
• Set
Metering Mode • Multiple
• Center weighted
• Spot
Stabilizer • Mode 1
• Mode 2
• Mode 3
Mode 1 is always active. Mode 2 only when the shutter is pressed. Mode 3 is used when horizontally panning.
Flash • Auto
• Auto with Red-eye correction
• On
• On with Red-eye correction
• Slow sync
• Slow sync with Red-eye correction
D.Red-eye • On
• Off
Camera tries to digitally remove red eyes from images.
Flash Syncro • 1st
• 2nd
Flash fires at start or end of exposure
Flash Adjust +/- 2 EV in 0.3 EV steps
i.Exposure • Off
• Low
• Standard
• High
Exposure and contrast are adjusted to compensate for scenes requiring a wide dynamic range
Ex. Opt. Zoom • On
• Off
"Extra Optical Zoom" - crops the image to simulate additional zoom
Digital Zoom • Off
• 2X
• 4X
Burst Rate • H
• L
Selects 3 or 2 fps shooting
Auto Bracket • Steps
3, 5 or 7 frames
1/3 or 2/3 EV steps
• Sequence:
0/-/+
-/0/+
Self-Timer • 10 sec
• 10 sec (3 images)
• 2 sec
Multi-Expo • Start
Next
Retake
Exit
• Auto gain
On
Off
Builds up an image from multiple exposures. Auto gain corrects the brightness
Color Space • sRGB
• AdobeRGB
Long Shtr NR • On
• Off
Takes a second, dark-frame to allow subtraction of long exposure noise
ISO Limit Set • Off
• 200
• 400
• 800
• 1600
Sets the maximum limit to which Auto or i.ISO settings will set the sensitivity.
ISO Increments • 1 EV
• 1/3 EV

Motion picture menu

Option Values / Actions Notes
Rec Mode • AVCHD
• Motion JPEG

Rec Quality

• Rec Mode: AVCHD
FHD
SH
H
L
• Rec Mode: Motion JPEG
HD
WVGA
VGA
QVGA

Exposure Mode • P
• A
• S
• M
This option is only active in creative motion picture mode
Metering Mode • Multiple
• Center weighted
• Spot
i.Exposure • Off
• Low
• Standard
• High
Exposure and contrast are adjusted to compensate for scenes requiring a wide dynamic range
Digital Zoom • Off
• 2X
• 4X
Wind Cut • Off
• Low
• Standard
• High
Reduces wind noise in motion picture recording

Custom menu

Option Values / Actions Notes
Cust. Set Mem. • C1: Set 1
• C2: Set 2
• C3: Set 3
Assigns current settings to one of three custom memories
LVF Disp. Style • Finder style
• LCD Monitor style
Electronic Viewfinder display style
LCD Disp. Style • Finder style
• LCD Monitor style
LCD Info. Disp. • 1 (Brown)
• 2 (Red)
• 3 (Black)
Selects the status view color scheme.
EVF/LCD Auto • Off
• On
Uses the proximity sensor to switch between EVF and LCD.
Histogram • Off
• On
Provides a histogram on the shooting screen
Guide lines • Off
• Thirds
• Center
• Movable

AF/AE Lock • AE
• AF
• AF/AE
Which parameters are locked by the AL/AE lock button
AF/AE Lock Hold • Off
• On
Is the action of the AF/AE Lock button retained?
Preview Hold • Off
• On
Is the action of the preview button retained upon button release?
Pre AF • Off
• Quick AF
• Continuous AF
Quick AF will start to try to achieve focus when it detects the camera is being held steadily.
Direct AF Area • Off
• On
On allows the AF point to be moved when in single-point AF mode
Focus Priority • Off
• On
Does the camera wait for focus before allowing shutter release
AF Assist Lamp • Off
• On
AF + MF • Off
• On
Allows manual fine-tuning of focus once AF lock has been achieved
MF Assist • Off
• On
Zooms in the view to allow high-precision manual focus
Expo. Settings • Switch by pressing front dial
• Switch by holding EVF/LCD button
Dictates how to toggle between the command dial's functions
Rec Area • Stills
• Movies
Changes the angle of view during motion picture and still picture recording
Remaining Disp • Stills (frames)
• Movies (time)
Switches between number of recordable pictures and available recording time
Movie button • Off
• On
Enables/disables the movie button
Dial Guide • Off
• On
Gives cues to the dial's function in the viewfinder after a change
Menu Resume • Off
• On
Menus return to last-used position
Pixel Refresh Start processing
Yes
No
Checks the sensor for malfunctioning pixels
Sensor cleaning Start processing
Yes
No
Shoot W/O Lens • Off
• On

Camera Menus

Record menu

Option Values / Actions Notes
Clock set • HH:MM, MMM/DD/YYYY
• Date order
M/D/Y
D/M/Y
Y/M/D
• Clock format
24Hr
AM/PM

World Time • Destination
• Home
Selects your home time zone and that of your current location. (From 33 regions)
Travel Date • Travel setup
• Location
This is for recording which day of your vacation you take a picture
Fn Button Set • Aspect ratio
• Quality
• Metering Mode
• i.Exposure
• Guide lines
• Rec Area
• Remaining Disp
Economy

• Power save
Off
1 Min
2 Min
5 Min
10 Min
• Auto LCD Off
Off
15 Sec
30 Sec

Auto review • Review
Off
1 Sec
3 Sec
5 Sec
Hold
• Zoom
Off
1 Sec
3 Sec
5 Sec
Highlight • Off
• On
Blinking highlights in playback mode
Monitor • Brightness
+/- 3
• Color and Saturation
+/- 3
LCD Mode • Off
• Auto Power LCD
• Power LCD
Auto mode brightens the LCD when needed. Power LCD brightens at all times.
Scene menu • Off
• Auto
Shows a mode selection menu when mode dial is turned to a scene setting [Example]
Beep • Muted
• Low
• High
Volume • Level 1 - 6
No.Reset • Reset File No. in the camera?
Yes/No
Reset • Reset Rec Settings?
Yes/No
• Reset Setup/Custom Parameters?
Yes/No
Options are presented sequentially
USB Mode • Select on connection
• PC
• PTP
Video Out • NTSC
• PAL
TV Aspect • 16:9
• 4:3
Selects output ratio of video output
HDMI • Auto
• 1080i
• 720p
• 576p
Selects the output from the HDMI port. 480p is selected instead of 576p when NTSC is selected under 'Video Out'
Viera Link • Off
• On
Allows the remote control from a Panasonic Viera TV to control the camera
Version Disp. • Body Firmware version
• Lens Firmware version
Language • English
• German
• French
• Spanish
• Italian
• Polish
• Czech
• Hungarian
• Dutch
• Turkish
• Portuguese
• Finnish
• Danish
• Swedish
• Japanese
Format • Yes
• No

My Menu

The GH1's My Menu isn't quite as sophisticated as the custom menu we've seen on some DSLRs, but it is perhaps more useful to the average user as it simply remembers the five most recently used menu items, and thus in most cases shows the settings you change most often.

Playback menu

Option Values / Actions Notes
Slide Show

Choose one of the following first:
• All
• Picture only
• Motion picture only
• Favorite
• Face recognition

Then pick from these options:
• Start
• Effect
Natural
Swing
Urban
Off
• Duration
1 sec
2 sec
3 sec
5 sec
• Repeat
On
Off
• Music
On
Off
• Audio
On
Off

Playback Mode • Normal play
• Picture play
• AVCHD play
• Motion JPEG play
• Face recognition play
Favorite • Off
• On
• Cancel
When enabled allows you to mark images as favorites by simply pressing the up arrow.
Title edit • Single
• Multi
Add text comments to images
Text stamp • Single
• Multi
'Stamp' image information onto a picture
Resize • Single
• Multi
Trimming (Select image)
Aspect Conv • 3:2
• 4:3
• 1:1
Converts 16:9 images to other aspect ratios
Rotate (Select image)
Rotate Disp. • Off
• On
Is the image rotated on playback
Print Set • Single
• Multi
• Cancel
Protect • Single
• Multi
• Cancel
Audio Dub.

Add audio to an image

Face recognition (Select image) Erases face recognition data in an image

Samples Galleries

There are 32 images in the sample galleries. Please do not reproduce any of these images on a website or any newsletter / magazine without prior permission (see our copyright page). We make the originals available for private users to download to their own machines for personal examination or printing (in conjunction with this review), we do so in good faith, please don't abuse it.

Unless otherwise noted images taken with no particular settings at full resolution. A reduced size image (within 1024 x 1024 bounds) is provided to be more easily viewed in your browser. As always the original untouched image is available by clicking on this reduced image.

Panasonic DMC-GH1 Samples Gallery - Posted 10 July 2009

You can find additional sample images in our preview gallery that was originally posted in May. Here you'll also find some additonal movie samples.

Panasonic GH1 Preview Gallery - Posted 15 May 2009 Updated 19 May 2009

Source : dpreview.com

Sphere: Related Content

Recent Post

Recent Comment